Enterprise security operations centers (SOCs) are being crushed under the burden of an estimated 200,000 events per day, according to IBM research. And while that’s a lot of events, what complicates matters even further is that only a tiny percentage of those events actually require immediate action. But because alerts lack context, security teams must treat one each equally. That means the average enterprise can waste more than 20,000 hours per year on malware containment alone.

Enter Watson for Cyber Security and IBM QRadar Advisor with Watson

IBM QRadar Advisor with Watson is the first solution to apply the power of Watson for Cyber Security. Watson for Cyber Security maintains a specialized corpus of security knowledge, which includes previously invisible unstructured data in the form of blogs, websites, threat intelligence feeds and more.

But Watson for Cyber Security is far more than a giant security library. Its real-time learning capabilities allow it to derive new knowledge and discover hidden relationships in the information it consumes. QRadar Advisor with Watson combines the analytical prowess of IBM QRadar and the cognitive capabilities of Watson for Cyber Security to investigate and qualify security incidents automatically and advise security analysts on nature and extent of the incident.

 

 

That means security analysts can use cognitive capabilities for threat investigations and remediation — shortening cybersecurity investigations from days or weeks to mere minutes.

Watch our on-demand webinar to see a live demo of QRadar Advisor with Watson

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