Think about how much time and energy you devote to routine upkeep of your car: oil changes, required repairs and even visits to the dealership to address potential safety recalls.

However, you probably haven’t spent as much time thinking about a potential hack of your car’s software applications. You might not even be aware that today’s cars are powered by complex, integrated computer systems – with some vehicles containing more than 100 microprocessors! These microprocessors run everything from dashboard “infotainment” systems to critical systems that control the car’s transmission, engine and exhaust systems.

Meanwhile, as vehicles become more connected internally and externally – via wi-fi networks, satellite connections, cellular connectivity and the recent Intelligent Transportation Systems standard – the number of potential ways for an attacker to hack into your vehicle is greater than ever.

Are you confident that the myriad of applications powering your car would pass their own “security safety inspections”?

This beneficial infographic provides you with the following:

  • A snapshot of key vulnerability points in your vehicle.
  • Primary attack vectors associated with most connected car hacks.
  • Actions you can take to prevent potential cyber-attacks.

 

 

Listen to the podcast: When We Don’t Know What We Don’t Know — Connected Cars, Smart Homes and IoT Security

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