Millennials, Baby Boomers and the Future of Identity

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IBM’s “Future of Identity Study,” released earlier this year, was commissioned to study global and generational preferences on authentication. Nearly 4,000 adults from the U.S., Asia-Pacific and Europe weighed in on everything from personal habits for managing passwords to the organizations they trust most to safeguard their personal data.

Among the study’s many interesting findings, it revealed that consumers of different generations have varying preferences on authentication and take substantially different approaches to cybersecurity overall. For instance, younger adults are less concerned with traditional password hygiene, though they are more inclined to use multifactor authentication, biometrics and password managers. Just the opposite, older adults choose and protect their passwords with more care, but are less likely to embrace newer technologies such as biometrics.

To gain additional insights into the ways people from different generations interact with their passwords, social media accounts and online financial accounts, IBM Security’s Dillon Townsel recently interviewed Payton, a 24-year-old community manager from Maryland, and Susan, a 68-year-old grandmother and retired schoolteacher, who — in our first revelation about privacy preferences — opted not to cite her location.

Listen now to learn more about the “Future of Identity Study” and discover whether Payton and Susan are representative of their respective generations or if they break the mold.

Read the complete IBM Study: The Future of Identity

Security Intelligence Staff

Security Intelligence Staff

Security Intelligence strives to be the leading site for technical and business-focused security content. Security is...