The 2018 Cost of a Data Breach Study from Ponemon Institute is now available.

IBM is proud to sponsor the eleventh annual Cost of a Data Breach Study, the industry’s gold-standard benchmark research, independently conducted by Ponemon Institute.

This year’s study found the average consolidated total cost of a data breach is $4 million. The study also reports that the cost incurred for each lost or stolen record containing sensitive and confidential information increased from a consolidated average of $154 to $158. In addition to cost data, the global study puts the likelihood of a material data breach involving 10,000 lost or stolen records in the next 24 months at 26 percent.

The research involved the collection of detailed information about the financial consequences of a data breach. For purposes of this research, a data breach occurs when sensitive, protected or confidential data is lost or stolen and put at risk. Over a 10-month period, Ponemon Institute researchers interviewed IT, compliance and information security practitioners representing 383 organizations in 12 countries: United States, United Kingdom, Germany, Australia, France, Brazil, Japan, Italy, India, the Arabian region (a consolidation of organizations in the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia), Canada and for the first time, South Africa.

Read the 2016 Cost of a Data Breach report to learn:

  • The average costs and consequences related to experiencing a data breach incident.
  • Seven global mega trends in the cost of data breach research.
  • The most common factors that influence and can limit the cost of a breach.

Download the 2018 Cost of a Data Breach Study from Ponemon Institute

More from Data Protection

Transitioning to Quantum-Safe Encryption

With their vast increase in computing power, quantum computers promise to revolutionize many fields. Artificial intelligence, medicine and space exploration all benefit from this technological leap — but that power is also a double-edged sword. The risk is that threat actors could abuse quantum computers to break the key cryptographic algorithms we depend upon for the safety of our digital world. This poses a threat to a wide range of critical areas. Fortunately, alternate cryptographic algorithms that are safe against…

How Do You Plan to Celebrate National Computer Security Day?

In October 2022, the world marked the 19th Cybersecurity Awareness Month. October might be over, but employers can still talk about awareness of digital threats. We all have another chance before then: National Computer Security Day. The History of National Computer Security Day The origins of National Computer Security Day trace back to 1988 and the Washington, D.C. chapter of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group on Security, Audit and Control. As noted by National Today, those in…

Resilient Companies Have a Disaster Recovery Plan

Historically, disaster recovery (DR) planning focused on protection against unlikely events such as fires, floods and natural disasters. Some companies mistakenly view DR as an insurance policy for which the likelihood of a claim is low. With the current financial and economic pressures, cutting or underfunding DR planning is a tempting prospect for many organizations. That impulse could be costly. Unfortunately, many companies have adopted newer technology delivery models without DR in mind, such as Cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Software-as-a-Service (SaaS)…

Millions Lost in Minutes — Mitigating Public-Facing Attacks

In recent years, many high-profile companies have suffered destructive cybersecurity breaches. These public-facing assaults cost organizations millions of dollars in minutes, from stock prices to media partnerships. Fast Company, Rockstar, Uber, Apple and more have all been victims of these costly and embarrassing attacks. The total average cost of a data breach has increased by 2.6% since 2021 and is now $4.35 million. Organizations that don't deploy zero trust security models also incur an average of $1 million more in…