Security researchers observed the Razy Trojan installing malicious extensions across multiple web browsers to steal cryptocurrency.

In 2018, Kaspersky Lab noticed that the Trojan was being distributed via advertising blocks on websites and free file hosting services disguised as legitimate software. The malware uses different infection processes for Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox and Yandex Browser, disabling automatic updates and integrity checks for installed extensions.

Razy then uses its main.js script to steal cryptocurrency by searching websites for the addresses of digital wallets. If it finds what it’s looking for, the Trojan replaces the wallet addresses with those controlled by the malware’s operators.

Razy can also spoof images of QR codes that point to cryptocurrency wallets, modify digital currency exchanges’ webpages by displaying messages that lure users with the promise of new features, and alter Google or Yandex search results to trick victims into visiting infected websites.

Not the First Cryptocurrency Stealer — And Likely Not the Last

The Razy Trojan isn’t the first malware known for stealing users’ cryptocurrency. In July 2018, for example, Fortinet came across a malware sample that modified victims’ clipboard content to replace a copied bitcoin address with one belonging to threat actors. Just a few months later, researchers at enSilo discovered DarkGate, malware that is capable of crypto-mining and ransomware-like behavior in addition to stealing virtual currency from victims’ wallets.

These malware samples played a part in the rise of cryptocurrency theft last year. In just the first six months of 2018, Carbon Black observed that digital currency theft reached $1.1 billion. One of the incidents that took place within that time period involved the theft of $530 million, as reported by CNN.

How to Defend Against Malware Like Razy

Security professionals can help defend against threats like Razy by incorporating artificial intelligence (AI) into their organizations’ malware defense strategies, including the use of AI in detectors and cyber deception to misdirect and deactivate AI-powered attacks. Experts also recommend using blockchain and other advanced technologies to protect against cryptocurrency threats.

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